Vaccine Hesitancy – Sunday Clippings

Hello there,

This week I wrote a post about the difference between Constructive Criticism and Hate and about how I think feedbacks should be given. Right then, on to the newsletter.

This week has been overwhelming with the second surge of Covid in India. And even though the vaccines are being made available for people to get and India being one of the fastest vaccine producers, there has still been a surge in the country because of the large masses of unvaccinated people.

Some folks are getting affected after getting the vaccine which discourages others. Do vaccines work? Is it safe to go to the vaccination centers? The only way out of the covid spike at the moment are the vaccines, not just for India but for the whole world.

The covid vaccines do work and researches have shown that it’s quite rare to get the virus after you’ve been vaccinated and even if you do, there are very few chances of it being life-threatening. It is important to know that only two or four people out of 10,000 can get covid after vaccination and the number of breakthrough infections are very small in number and are not worrisome.

Even after getting both doses, wearing masks and following the guidelines is essential until the majority of the country gets vaccinated. Its due to this surge that the vaccination process will be delayed and affected. India not only needs to get more vaccines but also, needs to make the process faster. In an article disusing this, Dr Rosenbaum writes,

“Of course, people who are determined to undermine confidence in vaccines will always find ways to spread misinformation. But a much larger proportion of the population may be willing to get vaccinated given the proper reassurances, and dismissing their concerns often leaves them seeking someone to validate them.

I suspect that’s one reason why correcting misinformation often falls short. Some people, for instance, may truly believe that vaccines cause autism. But for others, this ostensible fear may mask less easily expressed needs such as maintaining one’s identity, belonging to a group, or simply being heard. And yet respecting these more basic instincts also raises an uncomfortable question: At what point does empathy sacrifice scientific truth?”

Now personally, I know that vaccines are not 100% effective but it does prevent people from being hospitalized. And the surge is caused by fewer beds in hospitals and more infected people. At least 80 -85% of the people need to be vaccinated to achieve herd immunity and places being close to normal. The good news is that the hesitancy rate in India now down to 23%.

Still, many people need to be educated. At this stage, it’s significant to overcome any vaccine hesitancy and participate in protecting yourself and the people around you.

Have a safe week,

Vedant


This Week’s Clippings

1 – Podcast – I’ve been fairly erratic with my podcast consumption. It’s hard for me to sit idle and listen to something which is the reason I feel the audio can run in the background while you’re doing something less engaging. This conversation between Tim Ferris and Seth Godin was really educative and enjoyable. A small but useful piece of practical writing advice Seth gives is –

“This is easy. Write poorly. Continue writing poorly. Write poorly until it’s not bad anymore and then you’ll have something you can use. People who have trouble coming up with good ideas, if they’re telling you the truth, will tell you they don’t have very many bad ideas. But people who have plenty of good ideas, if they’re telling you the truth, will say they have even more bad ideas. So the goal isn’t to get good ideas; the goal is to get bad ideas. Because once you get enough bad ideas, then some good ones have to show up.”

2 – Article – Here’s an interesting article about how Gen-Z Has a Bad Case of “Main Character Syndrome”. I find it funny how people find new ways to romanticizing the day-to-day to day life which in a sense is good considering how stressed and exhausted the mental health has been during the pandemic. This reminds me of an article I wrote about the main character thing a few months back.

3 – Video – Here’s an amazing video about why Wednesdays should be a weekend instead of Saturday. It made me think about how thoughtless and cruel it is to ask people to work for five days without any breaks. It’s unproductive and tiring as everybody (from school students to office workers) is waiting for Saturday and proper sleep.

(This issue is a part of the “Sunday Clippings”. Every week I compile various useful insights, learnings and my highlights from interesting articles and books in a short and skimmable email newsletter. I’d love for you to sign up here and receive the future issues directly to your inbox.)